CPS got a new therapy dog this semester, and he’s adorable

Dug is a 2-year-old golden retriever who is the newest addition to CPS. He is handled and trained by Rinda Scoggan. (Photo by Abbey Marshall)

Ohio University Counseling and Psychological Services hired another furry friend this semester.

Dug, named after the talking golden retriever in Disney/Pixar’s Up, began seeing clients this academic year after the semi-retirement of Buddy, a 10-year-old standard poodle.

Rinda Scoggan, a senior counselor who trained both Dug and Buddy, said though Dug is only 2 years old and is new to the office, he is making significant progress as a therapy dog.

“Coming here, he wasn’t so sure about the size of the building,” she said. “But now he comes in, and he’s good about coming into the elevator now. He didn’t ride an elevator for the first time until the summer.”

She described him as being a “little shy” because he was raised by Scoggan’s son in the country and wasn’t used to being around so many people.

“Dug is slowly evolving,” she said. “He’s still a 2-year-old.”

Dug visits CPS offices on the third floor of Hudson Health Center every Monday.

“It’s helpful because some students have a dog back home, and they miss it,” Scoggan said.
“It just makes their day. They do form bonds that they love to pet him, and he’s so excited to see them. … He cares about them.”

Dug began visiting the offices in lieu of Buddy, who began experiencing arthritis associated with age. Scoggan tried giving him medicines to combat his ailments, but it just made him sick.

“I noticed at that time he had started limping last year,” she said. “I wanted him to be able to relax his body and his bones.”

Buddy’s much-needed break proved beneficial, and Scoggan noticed a renewed pep in his step.

“He’s much better,” she said. “I just think he needed to take a break. As long as he is able and as long as he wants to, I’m willing for him to come in once a month.”

Since Scoggan now has two dogs trained to help students, she said she is toying with the idea of having them come in more than one day a week.

“He really only sees the students who come in on Monday,” she said. “Some people schedule specifically on Mondays to just see him.”

Scoggan said as long as Buddy does not face any more medical problems, she would like to continue switching the two out.

“Sometimes dogs that do therapy can get a little depressed themselves,” she said. “The trainer recommended definitely switching out the dog.”

The therapy sessions are not only beneficial for the students, but also for the canines.

“A few years ago, when my kids all moved out, it was just Buddy and I,” she said. “Buddy started becoming depressed being in the house all the time. … It really helped him. He’s one that really needs to be petted, be loved on. Being in the house all day was not good for him. I just could tell there was a major difference.”

Other programs on campus exist to connect students to dogs, such as Bobcats of the Shelter Dogs which allows students to volunteer at the local dog shelter. Alden Library also hosts therapy dog visits near and during final week. Alden is hosting therapy dog events during finals week, and Dug from CPS will be the featured pup at one of the events.

Mia Chapman, a senior studying biological sciences pre-medicine, has been training a service dog named Clary since August through the OU branch program of 4 Paws for Ability. She said having dogs on college campuses is beneficial for not only students, but also all people who interact with the animals.

“As a student, it always brightens my day to see a dog because it’s a great stress relief and break from my daily activities,” she said. “Fostering a service dog has helped me realize the value that service dogs have to offer people with disabilities. These dogs are highly trained and help those who need them feel more comfortable out in public, as the dogs can help them physically and emotionally.”

@AbbeyMarshall

am877915@ohio.edu

Originally published for The Post on November 29, 2017.

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Despite low enrollment, women in OU tech programs thriving

Nicole Sova, a graduate student studying as a woman in STEM, poses for a portrait. (photo by Abbey Marshall)

Alexis Lanier, an electrical engineering student, has four women in her class.

According to a 2015 headcount from the Office of Institutional Research, only 15 percent of the Russ College of Engineering is female, despite the fact that technology is a “lucrative” field.

“There’s a lot of guys so (women) think they shouldn’t do it,” Lanier, a sophomore, said. “It’s definitely intimidating because it’s new to me, and I feel like the guys have always been really into it.”

J.J. DiGeronimo is no stranger to the frustrations those current students experience. As a 1995 OU alumna from the J. Warren McClure School of Information and Telecommunication Systems, DiGeronimo said most of her classes were at least 75 percent men.

Like many students, DiGeronimo’s main goal was to come out of college with a job. Because the ITS school was known at the time for a 100 percent job placement after graduation, pursuing a degree in communication systems management made sense.

“I was great in math,” she said. “I was great with numbers and science. … It was important for me to learn a feasible skillset the marketplace was looking for.”

As a keynote speaker and advocate for girls in STEM, DiGeronimo said gender stereotypes and inaccurate perceptions of the field can hinder a woman’s decision to enter the technology field.

“There’s some perceptions that it’s really geeky, that it’s a lot of coding, that they’re not going to fit in,” she said. “They don’t know people in the field to get experience or even ask questions of what it might be like. … There’s some preconceived notions that (women) are not going to like it.”

In most career fields, research shows women make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes, but in STEM fields, DiGeronimo said women make 92 cents for every dollar a man makes.

“As a whole, women in any field and men in any field should be about equal (numbers) just because it’s different points of view,” Katie Meeks, a sophomore studying biological sciences, said. “You are able to get a lot of different points of view and you are able to make more informed decisions.”

Although DiGeronimo said the lack of women in her college classes was unfortunate, she viewed it as a great preparation for the professional world.

“Most of my career, I have often been the only woman at the table,” she said. “Obtaining a degree that had more men than women prepared me for the workforce. I really didn’t have a lot of fear. I had already worked through some of my concerns about being the only woman.”

Meeks said her mother, a high school biology teacher, inspired her to pursue her dreams in STEM.

“Throughout elementary and middle school, I thought I didn’t like science,” Meeks said. “Once I came into high school and saw what my mother was doing, it made me want to do something better with my life.”

Though it helps to have representation in the field, DiGeronimo said those role models don’t always have to be female.

“I had a lot of great male mentors in my program that helped move me in the right direction,” she said. “You don’t necessarily have to look for the same gender. A lot of women look up to fathers, uncles, professors. It’s about getting around good people willing to help you in your career.”

Lanier agrees. She said her professors, who are primarily male, have been incredibly helpful because many of them are encouraging female participation in STEM fields.

“A lot of women tend to take support roles instead of the lead roles,” DiGeronimo said. “Don’t talk yourself out of the lead role. … Keep at it. It’s more about perseverance and persistence oftentimes than it is about how high of an IQ you have and how well you’ve done in your classes.”

@AbbeyMarshall

am877915@ohio.edu 

Originally published for The Post on Nov. 16, 2017.

Saddling Up: How OU students are using horses to help people with disabilities

Just 80 miles south of Athens, a veteran who suffered a stroke was riding horseback, led by Ohio University students. His wife, watching her husband ride from afar, hadn’t heard his voice in two years.

He had been riding at OU Southern’s horse park for several sessions, and he began to burst into song.

“Home, home on the range,” he belted. “Where the deer and the antelope play.”

Everyone stared in disbelief as a man who hadn’t spoken a word in years began to sing.

That is just one of the miracles that happens every day at OU Southern’s horse park, said Kelly Hall, the director of the equine studies program.

OU Southern Campus’s equine program is one of five accredited international schools to certify instructors in therapeutic riding, attracting dozens of students to enroll in hopes of pursuing a career that could change someone’s life.

A program run by students


Only two full-time faculty members staff the program, leaving the rest of the work up to students and volunteers to keep the rates for riding low. OU Southern charges $45 for a private community riding lesson and $35 for private therapeutic lessons.

horses
Photo by Emily Gayton

OU’s Southern Campus offers an equine studies program that certifies instructors in therapeutic riding. Dozens of students have enrolled in the program.

“It takes a lot,” Hall said. “If you have one person in a wheelchair, you’re going to have to have two side walkers — one on each side — and somebody to lead the horse. You’re going to have to have an instructor. … It takes a lot of volunteers to make this program happen.”

To earn their associate degrees, students are required to participate in 25 hours of instruction with a minimum of two riders with disabilities at a time.

“The community therapeutic horsemanship center serves the purpose of allowing our students to earn their hours, but it also serves the tri-state community for people with challenges,” Hall said.

Unlike many other equine programs, OU Southern has its own horse park and barns for convenience of completing lab hours and maintaining control over curriculum, attracting students from places as far as Hawaii to participate in the therapeutic riding program.

Students also teach, care for the horses and assume other responsibilities alongside volunteers and part-time employees.

“I’ve always liked helping people, and I love horses,” Julia Glebins, a first-year student, said. “I’ve been obsessed with them my entire life. It just seemed like a natural fit.”

A horse’s strength


Horseback riding provides many benefits for people with physical disabilities. Riding develops a sense of coordination and balance and strengthens the same muscles used to walk, which can be especially useful for someone in a wheelchair.

“It benefits them to learn a different or better way of living,”Tabatha McKinney, who works at STAR Community Justice Center

“We have a couple riders who are paraplegic and in a wheelchair,” Hall said. “By putting someone on a horse and the horse walks for them, they’re exercising those muscles to help them hopefully gain some mobility.”

Glebins said she was touched when she was serving as a volunteer last year and saw significant progress in a boy she was assisting.

“One of our participants started out in a wheelchair and couldn’t hardly walk, and now he’s up walking on his own and doesn’t need very much assistance,” she said. “He rides on his own, too. … It’s pretty incredible.”

The warmth of a horse


The benefits of therapeutic riding go beyond what can be seen on the surface. Hall said emotional and mental therapy is a lot of what the program tries to provide through its lessons.

The park works with agencies for weekly lessons and has served foster care industries, regional mental health industries and more.

“It benefits them to learn a different or better way of living,” said Tabatha McKinney, who works at STAR Community Justice Center. STAR serves as an alternative to prison with the intent of rehabilitating nonviolent felony offenders and frequently works with the horse park.

horses
Photo by Emily Gayton

Students teach and care for the horses, among other responsibilities. The program attracts students from places as far away as Hawaii.

OU Southern is partnered with Safe Harbor, a domestic violence shelter in northern Kentucky. The two secured a grant to bring children to the park weekly for riding lessons.

“It’s fun,” Jacob Bowman, 11, said. “I learn stuff about horses. They’re fun to play with and cute. I like it here.”

Hall said OU Southern tailors programs to specific needs. In the case of Safe Harbor, a main goal is teaching kids to positively identify and cope with emotions.

“I love riding (the horses),” Keagan Thornton, 8, said. “I’ve learned about leading and riding and about my emotions.”

Horses have unique personalities just like humans, Hall said. People might be drawn to a particular horse and learn a lot about their feelings from interacting with the animal.

“The horses show what we don’t want to face,” McKinney said. “The horses can sense your emotions. … It gives us a therapeutic moment to talk about those emotions instead of stuffing it.”

Expansion of the program


Since OU Southern’s equine program began offering online courses in spring 2016, adjunct professor Mark Abell said he has seen an increase in enrollment. He said this semester he has his largest class size of 26 people in introduction to equine studies, with students from the Athens campus and high school students enrolling.

“It’s really caught on,” he said. “It’s interesting because in the online program, you have a wide variety of experiences. … It’s a really good way for us to go beyond just the campus.”

Online classes, which are heavy on economics and technology, focus on the commercial side of the horse industry, Hall said. She said the staff rewrote the entire curriculum to accommodate online courses.

“Technology is really important in the horse world, too,” she said. “The horse industry is very large. There’s about a million full-time jobs in the horse industry.”

Many students are interested in starting nonprofits related to horses, so Hall said the program created online courses on equine nonprofit development and management.

Hall said they are also adding a degree to the eCampus. There will be a soft launch in January and a full launch in fall 2018.

“That’s a big deal for us,” Abell said. “I think it’s going to get bigger and bigger and bigger.”

Abell said he was excited for the program to grow and continue to flourish because of all the good he sees come out of it every day.

“It’s an absolutely wonderful program,” Abell said. “Miracles come from it. … When you watch their expressions and the light bulb comes on, and they see all of that because of the interaction with the horses, it’s really powerful.”

Originally published for The Post on Sept. 28, 2017. Appeared in print Sept. 28, 2017.

Where is Tumbles, the two-legged dog, now?

Tumbles playing outside near his dog wheelchair. Due to being born with just two legs, OU’s Innovation Center made a dog wheelchair for Tumbles nearly two years ago. (Photo by Abbey Marshall)

A local two-legged puppy tumbled his way into the hearts of millions two years ago after garnering international media attention. Nearly two years later, he no longer uses the wheels the Ohio University Innovation Center 3-D-printed for him.

Tumbles was born without his front legs. Because of his disability, he would get pushed out of the way by his brother and sister when he was trying to nurse, forcing his owner to give him up to a foster home.

Karen Pilcher, who was on the board of the Athens Friends of Shelter Dogs, has been by Tumbles’ side since he was four weeks old. She officially adopted him last December. He’ll be two years old soon.

Pilcher and some other members of the Athens Friends of Shelter Dogs created a Facebook page for Tumbles in November 2015, when he was six weeks old. An engineer saw the page and designed wheels to help Tumbles’ mobility. He brought his idea to the OU Innovation Center, who agreed to create the wheels using 3-D printing.

“OU was wonderful,” Pilcher said. “They only charged us for the materials for the wheels, not the labor. It only cost around $250, whereas other wheels are much more expensive.”

A video of Tumbles wheeling around began circulating the internet; before Pilcher knew it, she was the mother to a viral star.

“He was everywhere,” she said. “We got messages on Facebook and friends from all over the world. He was in the papers in England, Brazil, Germany, Ireland.”

Even though the wheels are adjustable and will last his lifetime, Pilcher said Tumbles doesn’t like to use them very much anymore. They inhibit his mobility, she said, and he much prefers hopping and pushing himself on his stomach. In the past few months, he also began walking on his back paws.

“He doesn’t know any different,” she said. “The thing that makes him great is his personality. There’s a lot of two legged dogs, and they all have great personality. They’re fighters.”

Tumbles now lives with three other dogs and 19 cats.

“They all get along great,” Pilcher said. “He’s just so happy about everything.”

@AbbeyMarshall

am877915@ohio.edu 

Originally published for The Post on Sept. 24, 2017.

On the lookout: the best places to people-watching Athens

With approximately 24,000 total students on Ohio University’s campus, students are bound to see some pretty cool things during their time in Athens. Here are some of the best places to observe others on and near campus:

Athens County Courthouse

The Athens County Courthouse, 1 S. Court St., is located right in the middle of Court Street, making it a prime people-watching location. Throughout the year, the area in front of the courthouse is the site of many protests spearheaded by local activists due to its central location.

Benches wrap around the trees between the courthouse and the Athens County Board of Elections, where Athens resident Kayla Graham sat and watched the cars and people pass by on Court Street.

“I live right down the road,” Graham said. “It’s a nice day, so might as well. I just like to watch people.”

Another bonus is that it is free to sit at the location, Graham said.

“If you sit at any other place, you have to eat there,” she said.

Tables outside Court Street restaurants

People Watching Spots

Patrick Connolly | FILE

(left to right) Caleb Amos, Cody Sutton, Marideth Rock and Lori Linnevers, all of Athens, Ohio, enjoy the view out of the Bagel Street Deli front window during HallOUween 2014.

Some local businesses on Court Street, such as Brenen’s Coffee Cafe and Whit’s Frozen Custard, have tables outside where students will often sit if the weather is nice enough.

“We sat outside because it’s such a nice day out, and it’s nice to take a break from studying and projects and all that,” Jane Dickerson, a rising junior studying graphic design, said while she sat outside Brenen’s Coffee Cafe.

Certain days are better for people-watching than others, including Fests and HallOUween.

“We were sitting here by the window on Palmer Place Fest, and people were just running around super drunk outside taking pictures and wearing weird stuff,” Dickerson said. “That was pretty funny.”

If they’re really lucky, students will be blessed with the presence of a furry friend scampering down the street with its owner.

“I love dog watching,” Dickerson said. “Definitely the dogs.”

College Green

College Green is the hub of OU. For more than 200 years, students have enjoyed the shady trees and brick sidewalks. When the weather is nice, students can be spotted swinging in a hammock doing homework, picnicking on blankets or sunbathing on College Green.

“I like seeing all the people out,” Carly Rankin, a rising senior studying biology, said while she sat at the Civil War Monument. “That’s one of my favorite things about Athens. When it’s nice out, all these people are just congregated all the time.”

Evan Schmidt, a 2017 OU alumnus, laid back on a picnic blanket on College Green eating Chipotle with some friends. He said that was one of his favorite things to do in Athens.

“(College Green) is the eclectic college feel of everyone hanging out on grass whenever they want,” he said. “It’s the most stereotypical college feel in Athens.”

Originally published in The Post‘s Orientation Guide on May 25, 2017. The orientation guide is on the stands at Ohio University during summer months to welcome freshman to campus life.

Athens adventures: Plenty of places to explore in southeast Ohio

During your four years on campus, you’re bound to get bored milling up and down Court Street every night, but Athens has plenty more to offer. In the surrounding area, there are an abundance of locations to explore.

The Ridges

Students who are brave of heart can take a trek up to The Ridges, a piece of land purchased by Ohio University in the late 20th century that used to serve as a mental health center.

The Athens Lunatic Asylum, as it was named when it opened in 1874, housed patients with mental health issues. The state and federal government purchased more than 1,000 acres of land to construct the hospital. Since the piece of land was so large, patients could roam the complex, tend to the orchards, take walks and attend plays.

As the number of patients dwindled — when practices such as shock therapy and lobotomies became more controversial — the main hospital building became abandoned. The bulk of the hospital is still uninhabited, although the Kennedy Museum of Art is housed inside the main building. OU houses offices in The Ridges as well.

Nearby the mostly-abandoned main building lies a cemetery with nameless graves. There are also other spooky tales, one of which involved a stain inside the hospital from a decomposed body. Because of the ambiance, many have dubbed The Ridges as haunted.

The Ridges also has several scenic hiking trails for those who are more faint of heart.

“If you go past the graveyard and up the hill, there’s a trail to this awesome meadow during springtime, which is beautiful,” •Amanda Poll, an OU alumna, said. “I love to run up to Radar Hill.”

Strouds Run

Strouds Run State Park is roughly a 15 minute drive from campus. The park is comprised of more than 2,000 acres, including a 161-acre artificial lake. In the late summer and early spring, students flock to Dow Lake to rent canoes, kayaks and pontoon boats to soak up the sun and explore the lake. There is even a small beach with sand and access to swimming.

“(When I went last week), there was a nice sunset over the water,” Jillian Sosnak, a rising sophomore studying biology, said. “There wasn’t a lot of people walking around either, which was nice.”

There are also hiking paths and campgrounds.

“We went on a hike around the entire lake last week,” Lillian Cahill, a rising sophomore studying biology, said. “We went about eight miles. … It was really secluded.”

Hocking Hills

If you’re looking for a day trip, Hocking Hills State Park is the perfect location. The park is located in Hocking County, about an hour’s drive from Athens. The park is chock-full of scenic trails that include waterfalls, streams and more.

“I’m a photographer, so I go to a lot of places like Hocking Hills,” Evan Schmidt, an OU alumnus, said. “If you take more of the unknown trails, you can find some really cool vantage points of the lakes around here.”

The most popular trail is Old Man’s Cave, which derives its name from a hermit who lived in the large cave on the trail.

“I didn’t go to Old Man’s Cave until (my senior) year and I now regret life because it’s so awesome,” Schmidt said.

Originally published in The Post‘s Orientation Guide on May 25, 2017. The orientation guide is on the stands at Ohio University during summer months to welcome freshman to campus life.

Being “Affrilachian”: Those who identify as both black and Appalachian have deep history

As the sun set on a cold February afternoon, 100 people gathered on and near Templeton-Blackburn Alumni Memorial Auditorium’s portico to speak out against rumors of a “resurgence” of the Ku Klux Klan in southeast Ohio.

Several speakers shared their stories to celebrate diversity in Athens and the surrounding region, one historically thought of as almost exclusively white. With an introspective rally as the backdrop, attendees wanted to prove an important point: Black lives matter, even in Appalachia.

Black people, who make up fewer than 5 percent of Athens County’s population and 9.1 percent of the Appalachian population, have long been overlooked in an impoverished region that is overwhelmingly white.

“When people say we need to fix the white problem first, you can’t fix one without fixing both,” Ada Woodson Adams, a Nelsonville resident and 1961 Ohio University graduate, said. “When people say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ it’s a cry out that we have not been heard or seen, and we have been systematically institutionalized.”

Frank X Walker, a professor of English and African-American studies at the University of Kentucky, invented the word ‘Affrilachia’ in 1991 in response to the marginalization of black people in the region. He penned the word in a poem as a way to explain the “invisibleness” of Affrilachians.

“A lot of scholars quickly embraced the word because it allowed them to recognize that diversity had not been a large part of the conversation when we talked about the 13-state region that officially was Appalachia,” Walker said. “They embraced the word and began to recognize that they had missed something.”

White people make up 83.6 percent of the people in Appalachia in comparison to the national white population of 63.7 percent, according to 2010 U.S. Census data.

That lack of visibility creates a stigma against black people in Appalachia, Otis Trotter, the author of Keeping Heart: A Memoir of Family Struggle, Race, and Medicine, said. He spent a majority of his childhood in West Virginia before moving to Newcomerstown, Ohio in the ’60s, where he was subject to criticism because of his Appalachian and black roots.

“We still were looked on as black hillbillies,” he said. “They anticipated that we could be these typical black hillbillies, that we were unsophisticated and dumb.”

Segregation in Ohio

Data from U.S. Census Bureau

Ohio’s de facto segregation was more subtle at that time than the blatant racism in the Deep South, Adams said.

“Going Uptown, we didn’t have the same places you could go and eat if you wanted to go to the restaurant with your friends, because they would turn you away,” she said. “There was no sign, but they would tell you you weren’t welcome there.”

A more glaring and obvious form of racial discrimination were so-called “Sundown Towns,” or communities that kept out black people by law. The term was coined because the towns would sometimes have signs by their city limits stating black people must be gone by sundown. Some of those areas remain very white to this day, according to James W. Loewen’s book Sundown Towns.

“Things like that affect the psyche of people black and white,” Adams said. “It diminishes the strength of a community when you have racism.”

Provided via the Little Cities of Black Diamonds Council

Integrated coal mining towns

Many black people migrated from the South to Appalachia to find work in the coal mining industry, as the Deep South lacked decent paying jobs for black workers. Trotter said his family moved from Alabama to West Virginia for that reason.

“My father was recruited by coal miners,” Trotter said. “He ventured out and tried to take jobs near where he lived, but he couldn’t find a paying job, so when the recruiters came, he took (them) up on (their) offer.”

A notorious integrated coal mining town was Rendville, located in Perry County. It was established by the Ohio Coal Mining Company in 1879, made up by primarily German immigrants and black families. Despite initial racial tensions, the town functioned much better than other integrated communities in Appalachia with a mixed race village council, Cheryl Blosser, office coordinator for The Little Cities of Black Diamonds, said.

The Little Cities of Black Diamonds is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the history of coal mining regions.

“Rendville had a lot of opportunities and many other black miners moved there to work,” Blosser said in an email. “Because all of (the workers) were new and the miner owner paid the workers the same rate, some black families prospered better.”

(Provided via Eberly Family Special Collections Library, Penn State University Libraries) Major Fountain and children, Rendville, Ohio Perry County Ohio 1946.

Being black at Ohio University

Though OU was relatively progressive during times of de facto segregation, problematic policies were still in place.

John Newton Templeton, a freed slave who earned his bachelor’s degree from OU in 1828, was the fourth black college graduate in the nation and first in the Midwest.

Templeton-Blackburn Alumni Memorial Auditorium on College Green is named for Templeton and Martha Blackburn, the first black woman to graduate from OU in 1916.

“It is nice that OU educated (Templeton). However, there are some stains on that,” Bailey Williams, a freshman in the Templeton Scholars Program, said.

Templeton could not live in university housing with other students, so he lived in the log cabin near the Hocking River that now houses the Office of Sustainability and the Visitor Parking Registration Center.

More than 100 years later, Adams faced similar discrimination. Adams, who began her freshman year in 1957, said she could not join social sororities or fraternities during her time on campus because of the color of her skin. She also could not complete her student teaching in Athens County because OU had an agreement with local schools that they would not send black teachers to instruct students.

Adams also noted subtly segregated areas on campus. For example, black students often gathered in a room in the student center called the “Bunch of Grapes Room,” which white students nicknamed the “Bunch of Apes Room.”

“We have to take the good with the bad,” Williams said. “I feel like a lot of our history gets washed down looking at the good. We have to take it for what it is and look at the good and the bad.”

Though incidents like the painting of a hanged figure on the graffiti wall in September have left a sour taste in Williams’ mouth, he said overall, he has not experienced discrimination because of the color of his skin.

“There is a good diversity blend here (at OU),” Williams said. “It’s not much, but what we do have, it’s diverse.”

Racism in Appalachia today

2010 U.S. Census

Appalachians have made significant strides, Trotter said, but negative stereotypes surrounding those who identify as both black and Appalachian still exist.

“There is still a negative stigma,” Trotter said. “A lot of people tend to think about Appalachia as monolithic: They’re all white, they’re all poor. Many people still have that perception.”

The key to true integration of the region is to understand the differences among the population, Trotter said.

“We need to highlight a variety of people (from Appalachia) that are doing well, that are educated,” he said. “You can’t overlook that there are poor people … but you also have to try to do something to make people realize that yes, you can be poor but also intelligent and diverse.”

Originally published in The Post on the front page on April 6, 2017.